Tag Archive | Bhikkhuni Ordination

Ven. Bodhicitta: Giving up a career to be a Bhikkhuni

This is a talk given by Ven. Bhikkhuṇī Bodhicittā at the opening of the Gotami Vihara in Kuala Lumpur recently.

In the talk which she explains about her upbringing and why she gave up a successful career in bio-medicine in order to become a bhikkhuṇī.

Continue reading

Ven. Bodhicitta: Is Bhikkhuni Ordination against the Buddha’s Teaching

Ven. Bodhicitta

Ven. Bodhicitta

The Sri Lankan bhikkhuṇī Ven. Bodhicittā discusses whether the recent reintroduction of the bhikkhuṇī ordination in the Theravāda Buddhist tradition is against the Buddha’s Teaching or intentions.

The talk was recorded at Mahindarama, Penang, as part of a tour organised by the Support Network for Women Renunciants in Malaysia and Singapore in February 2012.

Photos of the Bhikkhuni Ordination in California

These are photographs from the recent ordination of two Bhikkhunis in ABS Temple, Sacremento, California on May 6th 2012. The nuns concerned were Ven. Nibbidā and Ven Mārajinā. I am very grateful to Ayya Anandabodhi for allowing me to reproduce these photographs here from her Facebook album.


Ven. Nibbida and Ven. Marajina

Ven. Nibbida and Ven. Marajina

Continue reading

Ayya Sobhana: The Way of a Bhikkhuni

Ayya Sobhana

Ayya Sobhana

A short video interview with the American nun Ayya Sobhana in which she discusses the reintroduction of the Bhikkhuni Sangha, her ordination in Sri Lanka and their way of life at Aranya Bodhi monastery in Sacramento, which is based on simplicity, few wants and being in touch with the natural world around them.

Photographs from the Recent Bhikkhuni Ordination at Dhammasara in Perth

Here are some photographs of the recent Bhikkhuni ordinations at the Dhammasara Nunnery in Perth, and its confirmation by the monks at Bodhinyana. They are provided courtesy of Ayya Tathaaloka, who acted as pavattini at the ordination.

Continue reading

Adhimutta Bhikkhuni: What is it like being a Bhikkhuni?

reflections on a question posed by a friend, shortly after ordination, August 2010.

Well, just normal and natural, no big deal – it’s easier to write about what it is like not being able to ordain, what it is like being held in other forms of ordination when one is ready to unfold, how it is when a natural progression is interrupted, what that energetic blocking is like and all the justifications and complications and repressions and denials and convolutions needed to keep this in place.

Adhimutta Bhikkhuni

Adhimutta Bhikkhuni

But then, when a flower unfolds, opens out under the sun with moisture from the earth just as it should, it’s very beautiful, normal and natural, and a joy and pleasure arise from the beauty of just the ordinary and yet the extra-ordinary too.

When things are working well they are almost not noticed. Just as after a long period of illness one  really notices the pleasure of lack of illness – when something has been giving pain for a long time one really notices and appreciates the lack of pain, the ease in this.  But the lack of pain is in some ways nothing special also – except the miracle of so many things having to be working well for there to be this ease – and if there is an ease in suffering after a long time of illness, and when there have been many things wrong, then it is very miraculous, very lovely.

Spaces where normal and natural unfolding is possible are very precious – like good friends, jewels radiate through a lifetime, and make a whole life beautiful, something to be treasured deeply. Yet, at the time, one just enjoys that space, that easy companionship – and afterwards looking back see how this companionship made so much possible, but at the time it just is.

Continue reading

Slideshow of Photos from Spirit Rock Bhikkhuni Ordination

Here is a wonderful slideshow of photographs from the recent Bhikkhuni ordination ceremony at Spirit Rock in California in which Ayyas Anandabodhi, Santacitta and Nimmala received their higher ordination. The chanting is of Aggasāvikā Bhikkhunī by Melanie Zeiki, text and translation are below.

Continue reading